Organic spices

Coriander seeds in hand

Korerima (ኮሮሪማ), otherwise known as black cardamom, is an adored, sweet, lively, and very expensive spice.

We use it with love in our sweat potato, lentils, stews and awaze sauce.

It grows wild under the shade of coffee trees in southern Ethiopia and is sun-dried. It can be a base spice for most spice blends and used to add flavor to cream and tomato based sauces, stews, sautes, and soups.

Many of Eritrean and Ethiopia’s spices have a touch of mystery about them as they are not commonly found around the planet. Great dedication and skill is taken to prepare our spices from the best available produce. The agriculture system for spices 🍃in Ethiopia and Eritrea are all rain fed and almost all are cultivated organically from the wild. Farmers also observe Global Good Agricultural requirements. The final evidence is in the taste.

Selam is an Ethiopian and Eritrean restaurant. Join us at 812 Bloor St W in Toronto. We’re a 4 min walk east of Ossington Subway/Green P. 416-915-7225

Frankincense

Frankincense and coffee

🌳Frankincense is a tree sap that gives a sweet pine-like aroma when heated. It’s been used since ancient times to heighten spirituality✨, to cleanse a room🧹, and to ward off bad spirits.👻

Frankincense helps mental clarity🙋, relaxation🧘🏾 and is anti-fungal🌞. The special smell comes from special molecules⚛. Research has shown that it may help with pain relief, depression and anxiety.

Frankincense is often part of a coffee ceremony. An invitation to attend one considered a mark of friendship or respect and is an excellent example of Ethiopian hospitality.

Woman in traditional dress pouring coffee

Selam is an Ethiopian and Eritrean restaurant. Join us at 812 Bloor St W in Toronto. We’re a 4 min walk east of Ossington Subway/Green P. 416-915-7225

Mit-Mita

Mit-mita is sprinkled on delicacies, spooned onto injera or flava beans, or is lightly dipped into.

Ingredients can include: Ground African bird’s eye chili peppers, cardamom seed and salt.

Berbere spice

It’s been said that berbere is to Eritreans and Ethiopians as garam masala is to Indians, as vegeta is to Eastern Europeans, as thyme is to Jamaicans, as phố is to Viets, as… you get the idea. Berbere is at the heart of our cuisine.

Ingredients can include: chili peppers, garlic, ginger, basil, korarima (Ethiopian cardamom), rue, ajwain or radhuni, nigella, and fenugreek.

Awaze Sauce

Awaze is dipped into so as to make food more flavourful with its berbere, red wine and mustard elements. It’s a perfect one-of-a-kind dip to have with non-spicy raw, cooked, or BBQed veggies. Despite its popularity back home you’d be hard pressed to find this here.

Ingredients can include: Un-spiced cayenne pepper, mustard, ginger, red wine, extra virgin olive oil, rue seed, sage, sea salt.